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have to model allows people to get that for example, hurricane sandy 80 people are not happy with what he something like that that inner-city when you are living in a tent. there is something like 74,000 acres of land we are still going dealing with a very urgent and difficult situation in haiti. >> host: where did your book, "so spoke the earth" come from? >> guest: it came from women writers of haitian descent. it is the navigation of patients to tell their stories and these groups of women, the edited this anthology. it is "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know." different women talk about this. it is a trilingual anthology in english, french, and creole. it's generational. we talk about the people who were surviving it. we talk about their friends and neighbors. there is an opportunity for people who don't know much about haiti to get to know katie through a variety of women writers wasted. >> host: is creole very different from french? >> guest: creel -- creole is a language of its own. it came from the french, spanish, english, all of th
: sandy dedell smith is a guest. "elizabeth the queen" is the topic. we will begin with a caller from new york. >> caller: my question is with this band of the queen elizabeth's reign one of the longest in the history of the u.k. with all the prime minister's she has worked with how has that impacted her as a queen from your knowledge? >>guest: she has a vast store of information. she does not have the ideological filter. she takes things and and why she is so valuable to the people who come to her for confidentiality. prime ministers meet with her for one hour every week but others, she has the wisdom as well as a body of knowledge and an extraordinary memory for things. when public officials come to her to ask for guidance, they always remark, even if they are skeptical with a private audience, and nobody else is in the room to record which gives them freedom to say what is on their mind. harold wilson, a labor prime minister in the '70s is hard to say but she had an affectionate relationship with him. the private secretary said he considered her to be a very astute diplomat of the poli
to forget that for example, hurricane sandy went through haiti and people in the northeast now have a sense what it wase like.ple, imagine something like thaticane going through your neighborhood, your city when you're living in a tent. there's something like 74,000th acre or more of land that hashe been the harvest, you know. more problems ahead that have grown as a result of the earth spooking, if you will, with the hurricane. you have more food insecurity. a number of cholera cases have increased with hurricane sandy. we're dealing and people tend to forget we are -- canceling canceling with urgent and difficult situation in haiti. >> where did "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know" come from? >> it is anin wy difcu anthologs edited by a group of women here >> miami of women writers called women writers of haitianf decedent.o wr one of theer intellectual wrote. book "so spoke the uncle" he advocated for haitians to take control of their stories, to tell their stories "barack obama: the stories" of their lives at literature and those women, the
relief package for areas affected by hurricane sandy. and negotiations on the fiscal cliff continue and debate on a deal is possible in either the house or the senate once it's announced. >> the senate is running a little bit behind schedule. senators were expected back in for a brief pro forma session about ten minutes ago at noon eastern time. in the meantime, a look ahead to tomorrow morning's "washington journal." a look at the biggest foreign policy events of 2012, our guest is ely lake of news week and the daily beast. then the biggest political stories of 2012. we'll look at that with juan williams. "washington journal" starts every morning at 7 eastern on c-span. >> as we wait for this pro forma session to get under way, some information about programming happening the day after christmas. c-span spoke with two retiring lawmakers, congressman dan burton and senator kent conrad. mr. burton, an indiana republican, served in congress for 30 years, and in the 1990s chaired the house oversight committee. senator conrad, the north dakota democrat, has been in office for 20 years a
with hurricane sandy last week in new york, two weeks ago now, when all of lower manhattan was dark except for the goldman sachs tower because of the effort put into insuring that their infrastructure is as robust and fail-safe as possible. >> host: so, andrew blum, why is it that goldman sachs had that electricity and power going on when, like you said, the rest of manhattan, 60 hudson street being dark? did 60 hudson go down as well? because i know we had a lot of problems even sending e-mails from new york to washington and getting those connectioned. >> yeah. 60 hudson like, essentially, every other pay your internet building in new york, switched over successfully to diesel power. the week before last the internet in new york ran on diesel. it was just as simple as that. they all have these backup generators. when you visit one of these big internet buildings, there's always the point in the tour when you come to the school bus, this kind of hot, still room filled with an enormous, you know, perhaps four megawatt diesel generator. and last week in the case of 60 hudson, in the case of
. the reason superstorm sandy cause such damage in the northeast of the united states was not exclusively related to environmental policies and actions taken in the united states of america. .. and the course of civilization and the history of civilization and taking government from small tribes and villages to cities and states, to nationstates, is too broader and broader societal groupings, because our economy is extended across the borders and our travel is extended across the borders and the risks we face came from beyond those borders so it's only natural that over time, we will develop stronger global institutions because we face more shared problems with all of those people. i can add one last thing. remember the beginning of the united states of america. the economy of the southern northern states was very very different and evey today, the economy in montana im very different from the economy and lower manhattan. and we found a way to deal with that and to regulate it. the same is true in europe in the same is true in china and the same is true in india and brazil. india. same is
with her cane sandy of those in new jersey and staten island can also unfortunately relate to to this challenge. what do you do? whether we come to the story line with that connection we all have disasters. and the unexpected moments when suddenly things are not the same. we are in a new paradigm. how do we survive? this moment of crisis will test us. instincts, loyalties, faith in ourselves, creativity, he motions and certainly our courage. may 16, 1874 a reservoir dam gave way in western massachusetts to a nation in and tidal wave that was between 20 and 40 feet high and 300 feet wide and came down a 14-mile valley swept through williamsburg williamsburg, skinnerville, florence and new hampton. to give a sense of the power to appreciate the time it took to pass through portions of the valley. in the lower portion the land was turned into a plane and it took an hour and a half to fled northampton to flood into the connecticut river. in the of the region's the 600 million gallons of water went through a williamsburg williamsburg, skinnerville and hated bill 15 minutes each.
they as much as inner-city people talk about under these definitions on a daily basis during hurricane sandy i was blown away by the extraordinary kindness people showed to their neighbors. when i was then a tough neighborhood a disabled woman rolled up to say i will give you two cases of water. she said i need them. i said you would be delivering water in your neighborhood? she said yes. we check out. we should have delivered water to hear -- to gerber she was delivering it to others. that is the degree of expression of humanity. i do know when somebody does something like that it inspires other people why when pitcher of a cop giving shoes become viral? we hunger for that. ways the uptick of giving during christmas time? the infectious spirit that should not be just one month per year. if every single day we instruct others we all carry a toxin and we should not keep it for ourselves. somebody banished my cynicism. just negative 20 somethings i remember this pool of slush then i see an older african-american woman pushing a cart i said i will go help this woman of course. then this guide jum
reminded of that of late. in the wake of hurricane sandy, many of us faced days without power, and when our laptops and ipads and ereaders ran out of battery life, we turned to books. reading them by candlelight. [applause] >> no matter how clever, convenient, or cutting edge digital media becomes in the future, books will remain and will always be a part of the conversation at the "new york times." we know there would not be a times book review without all of you. the editors and publishers and writers who devote their time to bringing books, creating books, bringing them to readers. so, i'd like to thank all of you, again, for continuing to tell your stories, so that we can tell ours. thank you. [applause] [applause] >> and now, to present the medal for distinguished contribution to american letters is martin amis. martin is the author of 13 novels. he is the author of the memoir, experience, two collections of short stories and six books nonfiction, including the second plane. he was literary editor of the new statesman and served as the prefer of creative writing at the center for new w
network and that is true in a slightly different from with hurricane sandy last week in new york, when all of lower manhattan was dark except for the goldman sachs tower because of the effort put into ensuring that their infrastructure is as robust an fail-safe as possible. >> host: andrew plumb, why is it the goldman sachs had that electricity and power going on when like you said the rest of manhattan, 60 hudson st., being dark. did 60 hudson go down as well because they know we had a lot of problems even sending e-mails to new york from washington and getting those connected. >> guest: yeah, 60 hudson like essentially every other major internet building in new york switched over in the case of hudson switched over to diesel power. the week before last it ran on diesel. it was as simple as that. they all have backup generators. when you get one of these big internet buildings there is a point in the tour when you come to a school bus, hot room filled with four-megawatt eagle generator and last week in the case of 60 hudson and 111, eighth avenue another important internet hub, building o
yesterday, bob and sandy davis in st. louis have been very involved in efforts for adopting children from russia and the ukraine. i talked to a young man this morning, sergei quincy from branson who is 22 who was adopted by the quincys in franson when he was 14, 14, he comes to the united states, doesn't speak any english, starts the ninth grade, learns english, at 22 he's now happily married with a couple of young children, and he's -- he told me, he said that the moment of his adoption was the moment that made his dreams possible. in a bad family situation, institutionalized with his brother and sister in three different orphanages and the moment of his adoption and his brother was adopted by the same family who didn't know about his sister, made this possible. i talked to senator john lamping in missouri who adopted a son who is now 14, who had never gone to school. when he was adopted at eight or nine years old, had never been to school anywhere. i would hope, mr. president, that the senate speaks strongly, that we work as effectively as we can with russian representatives in this cou
was in the magazine in 1955.e/ a 10 carson started work ona/ao sandy spring, it is clear whatever she did was going to be in "the new yorker" first. so that i worked out in close consultation with william shawn at the magazine when she started working on that book. she initially didn't want to write "silent spring." even though she was concerned about pesticides that something should be done, she thought someone else should do it. one of the things that inspired the book was a lawsuit filed in 1958 group of landowners on long island in new york who sued the state of new york to try to get them to stop spraying ddt over the property. carson got "the new yorker" should write about this trial, this lawsuit msi let journalists into her and not up her alley, so she tried to convince vb way to cover this trial for "the new yorker." way to the domain is carson did and was concerned about pesticides drawback is that i don't attempt to do it, but you should do it. the project kind of took off from there. >> you mentioned the first use of ddt. >> where we -- sorry? >> to first use of ddt in the u.s. where wa
to rebuild their lives, their lives that have been now in ruin. and also now, given hurricane sandy, those down in new jersey and staten island and in queens and in brooklyn can also, unfortunately, relate to this challenge. what do you do. now, whether we come to the storyline with that kind of connection or not, we've all had disasters in our experience. we've all had those unexpected moments where something happens, and suddenly our life isn't the same as it was a moment before. everything is changed. we're in a new paradigm. and we have to figure out how do we survive. these moments of crisis test us. they test our instincts, our loyalties, our faith in ourselves, our creativity. they test our emotions, and they certainly test our courage. on may 16, 1874, a reservoir dam gave way in western montana. it unleashed an inland tidal wave that was at times 20-40 feet high and 300 feet wide. it roared down a 14-mile valley and swept through the villages of williamsburg, skinnerville, haydenville and the town of north hatchton. to give you a sense of the power of that water is to appreciate t
that much effort to be there for our kids. i was very happy during sandy we did some things to raise through covenant house and the cooperation of extraordinary people to raise a lot of money because it doesn't take that much money to give a person the doorway of hope. the last thing i will say is for me i get very upset because when i first became mayor i have a metaphor that i clung to, i would tell people i was such an optimistic and hopeful person, i am a prisoner of hole. we walked through city hall seven years ago there were so many challengess, we are prisoners of hope. we do nothing but hope. seven years later my metaphor has changed because i see powerful the trans formative things happen in every sector of the city from a down housing market to creativity, to double the production of affordable housing. first time in sixty years the population is going up. downtown in 40 years, built by new yorkers, so my metaphor has changed. i am no longer a prisoner of hope, i am hope unhinged because i now believe in my heart of hearts there is no problem, poverty, homelessness, no problem we c
conversations] >> it's called him knows where the time goes. i think sandy denny wrote it. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [applause] >> my name is strand life or i'm the owner at the palace -- book has streets of a deposit. we've been here since 1975 and we sell books, real books. books that you can hold in your hand, crack open, cuddle up in a chair with, those kind of books. i started out in the publishing industry. i was a sales rep for simon & schuster and for penguin now. that was back in the 70s and 80s. i sold books all over upstate new york and throughout new england. after 10 years of that lifestyle i decided i wanted to go to the other side of the counter and sell books. so i went to work for the bookstore here in this plaza and i eventually bought into the business and then bought the business out. so i have been here as sole owner since 1991. it's been an up-and-down history since then. shortly after he purchased the store with a small business administration loan, it was barnes & noble and borders moved to.
in the cleanup effort for hurricane sandy. i think about specifically focused cooperation is the center of this work. it's a very challenging thing to do. as i tell myself all the time, my personal progressivism is subsumed to focus on pluralism in my role. when we work with evangelicals and lots of them, i have huge admiration for what one would call the social capital in america. i am not leaving with my progressivism. i am leaving with dimensions of my tradition and i am saying, what can we do together? effectively, what i hope i am listing is there is a notion that there are folks out there building movements for progressivism and liberal theology that come from different religions. i think there are very few people were finding ways to build bridges in the theological perspective. that is what we hope to mobilize >> one more question and then we've opened it up. >> i think you and i have not talked about this. but i am a universalist. i have a deep respect for the atheist position. because i discovered that in my conversation with a lot of atheists, they don't believe in a god that
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)